Why You Must Step Out of Your Comfort Zone

I love this amazing story

Charles Blondin was a tightrope-walker who in 1860 strung a tightrope across the Niagara Falls.  Before thousands of people he inched his way from the Canadian side of the falls to the United States side. He walked across the falls, several times… each time with a different daring feat – once in a sack, on stilts, on a bicycle, in the dark, and blindfolded. One time he even carried a stove and cooked an omelet in the middle of the rope!

He finally went across, pushing a wheelbarrow holding a sack of potatoes.  When he got to one side he shouted “I am Blondin! Do you believe in me?” The crowd shouted back, “We believe! We believe! We believe!

Again, he quieted the crowd, and once more he shouted to them, “I’m going back across the tightrope, but this time I’m going to carry someone in the wheelbarrow. Do you believe I can do that?” The crowd yelled, “We believe! We believe!  He quieted them one more time, and then he said, “Who will be that person?” The crowd went dead. Nothing.

The point of the story is blatantly clear: Thousand’s people stood there that day chanting, “We believe, we believe!” but no one really believed in him and was willing to step out of their comfort zone. Here’s why you absolutely must…

Introducing Change Without Killing Your Student Ministry

We’ve Never Done it that Way Before

We’ve all heard these statements: – “We’ve never done it that way before” and “It’s always been done like this.”  Change is inevitable in life; we change as individuals.  Our cities grow and change, and we face change in our jobs and families.  A person can’t live without change affecting them.  Yet some people resist or feel uncomfortable with change. Here’s what we need to know and do about this…

6 Steps to Improve Your Relationship with Your Lead Pastor

Are you killing this important relationship?

Too often student ministry pastors don’t work on their relationship with the lead pastor.  If you’re not careful you may miss these important steps to develop a growing and healthy relationship.  The lead pastor can be your biggest ally, advocate, and supporter! Like any relationship, this one needs to be developed. It is going to take time, understanding and trust. Here are the 6 steps I’ve found the most useful.

6 Things I Wish I Knew When I Started in Youth Ministry

I thought I knew what I was doing but…

… I realized I had a lot to learn!

I was recently looking through some old pictures of all the different youth ministries I’ve had the privilege to lead. After over 20 years in youth ministry, I’ve had my share of successes and failures.  There are many things that I wish I had known way back when I started. Here are 6 of them.

How to Know if We’re Modelling or Faking

We’re supposed to model behaviors that we are trying to develop in our team.

The danger is modeling behaviors that aren’t genuine expressions of who we are. This is especially true when it comes to living out our Christian lives in the public. When our public life doesn’t line up with our private life, we aren’t ‘being an example we’re faking or acting. Here are 4 danger areas for me:

5 Amazing Things You Can Do When No One Shows Up

It looked like a total bust.

We planned an indoor beach party in February and hardly anyone showed up. I was thinking, ‘this is a total disaster.’ The student leaders had worked hard at making a beach volleyball game, a beach themed photo booth, and special slushies with fancy umbrellas. Sadly, only the student leaders showed up. I wish I knew then what I know now about what to do when nobody shows. Here are 5 things you can do:

Are You Worth Following?  4 Criteria to See If You Are

You are involved in youth ministry.  Therefore I have an assumption that you want to impact the lives of students.  In fact you probably want to mentor some of them.

The simple question I have is, “Are you worth following?

I really don’t care how cool you are or if you are immensely talented.  I am talking about other things; deeper things, things that anyone can have, if they are willing to work for them.

Here are 4 criteria that you need to see if students should be following you or not.